Posts Tagged ‘health’

What is YOUR Milk Preference?

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

Whether it comes from a carton, a glass jar, or a plastic jug, cow’s milk is generally what most people are used to drinking. Did you know there are different kinds of milk? So, with so many different kinds of milk in grocery stores how do we know which ones to choose?

  • Soy Milk – Made from an extract of soy beans and is typically mixed with water and a natural sweetener.
  • Rice Milk – Made from a mixture of partially milled rice and water.
  • Organic Milk – Comes from cows that have been fed organic feed, roam freely, or graze on pesticide free grass.
  • Raw Milk – Comes from cows but is not pasteurized.

Cow’s milk is generally pasteurized but some people believe that you should try raw cow’s milk to ensure you are getting as many nutrients as possible. Pasteurization is the process that kills all of the harmful bacteria in raw milk by heating it to a specific temperature for a specific amount of time. Pasteurization was developed by Louis Pasteur in 1864, as a means of killing organisms responsible for diseases like typhoid fever, tuberculosis, and diphtheria.

Cow’s milk that has been pasteurized offers 9 essential nutrients such as:

  • Calcium                          
  • Protein
  • Potassium
  • Phosphorus
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin A
  • Riboflavin (B2)
  •  Niacin

What if you’re a vegan or your poor tummy can’t digest cow’s milk? There are a a lot of different choices. We suggest trying rice milk or soy milk.

Soy milk is dairy-free and made from an extract of soy beans. It is typically mixed with water and a natural sweetener so it tastes and looks similar cow’s milk. Soy milk often has calcium and vitamin D added to it to increase its nutritional value.

Rice milk is also dairy-freeand is made from a mixture of partially milled rice and water. It often has vitamin A, vitamin D, B vitamins, calcium and iron added to enhance its nutritional benefits.

No matter what you choose,it is important to keep a balanced diet. To get the full benefits of cow’s milk and these nine essential nutrients, the USDA recommends adults and children to consume two to three servings of milk (or cheese or yogurt) each day. A serving size is 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1.5 ounces of natural cheese or 2 ounces of processed cheese.

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High-Fructose Corn Syrup VS Sugar – Pros and Cons

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

 What do you really know about high-fructose corn syrup and sugar? The media often portrays sugar and high-fructose corn syrup as the main culprit in obesity. But what’s the difference between high-fructose corn syrup and sugar?

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a common sweetener. Research shows that high-fructose corn syrup is chemically similar to table sugar. Fructose, part of HFCS, is a naturally occurring simple sugar that’s produced by nature. It is more soluble in water than glucose. Glucose is another simple sugar that is also made in nature. When you put fructose and glucose together it becomes a basic form of table sugar.

Corn syrup is made from corn starch and has a high content of glucose. It is combined with fructose to make high fructose corn syrup. There is controversy over how the body reacts to high-fructose corn syrup instead of table sugar because it is made chemically.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), there are two types of sugars in American diets: naturally occurring sugars and added sugars. Women should consume no more than 100 calories per day (about 6 teaspoons of sugar). Men should consume about 150 calories per day (about 9 teaspoons).

 

Tips from the American Heart Association for Reducing Sugar in Your Diet

* Don’t add sugar to cereal, grits, or oatmeal. Try fresh fruit or dried fruit instead.

* Instead of adding sugar in recipes use various spices or extracts to increase flavor.

* Try non-nutritive sweeteners such as aspartame, sucralose or saccharin. The FDA has determined that non-nutritive sweeteners are safe.

* Cut back on the amount of sugar added to things you eat or drink regularly like coffee or tea.

* Buy sugar-free or low-calorie beverages.

* Buy fresh fruit!

The next time you are in Bridgeport Cafe, think twice about adding lots of sugar to your breakfast and consider adding fresh fruit instead!

The 6th Annual Cleveland Senior Walk

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

The 6th Annual Senior Walk

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Cleveland City Hall, Mall C

601 Lakeside Avenue, Clevelan, Ohio

If Rain or Construction, the walk will take place  inside Public Hall

Registration & Health Screenings at 8:45a.m.

Walk begins at 10:00 a.m.

Bring comfortable shoes and come down for this FREE one or two mile fun walk. T-shirts will be provided!

Walkers are encouraged to carpool and park in the Municipal Lot at E. 9th Street and the Shoreway for $3.00 (Exact change required) (All vans and buses transporting groups too!)

 FREE shuttles will be available from the Municipal Lot to take walkers to City Hall.

For questions or more information, contact the Cleveland Department of Aging at 216-664-2833.

 

Walking in Central June 26th

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

Looking for the Soul of the City–Walking as Pilgrimage is a collection of Trinity Cathedral parishioners and others who are interested in learning about our region by walking and seeing urban neighborhoods through the eyes of those who know and love them. You will enjoy these walks if you want to learn more about Cleveland’s neighborhoods, you already know and love these neighborhoods and want to share them with others, or you take pleasure in exercise and fellowship with a congenial group

The  next walk is:

Saturday June 26th

Meet at 8:45 AM

Trinity Cathedral Parking Lot E. 22nd and Prospect

On the 26th, the group will be exploring Cleveland’s Central Neighborhood, first settled in the 1800’s by German immigrants, Central is home to the nations first planned housing development (Outhwaite & Central) homes, as well as major Cleveland institutions including Cleveland State, Cuyahoga Community College and St. Vincent Charity Hospital have current or recently completed major development projects.  Walkers will see thriving community gardens (including Trinity’s own!), new single family home neighborhoods, CMHA’s new and prospering Carver Park development and Marion Sterling Elementary School.

Please RSVP to Marie Kittredge, Executive Director

Slavic Village Development (p) 216-429-1182 ext 128 (c) 216-513-4002

This will be the contact phone number on the day of the hike.  

Central & Campus District Bicycle Tour

Thursday, May 6th, 2010

Central & Campus District Bicycle Tour

Celebrate Cleveland Bicycle Week by experiencing and learning about two of Cleveland’s most exciting neighborhoods!

 Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 6-7:30pm Meet at the Downtown YMCA 2200 Prospect Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 44115

Join us for a free guided bicycle tour of two of Cleveland’s most exciting neighborhoods!

 As part of Cleveland Bicycle Week, Burten, Bell, Carr Development, Inc. and Campus District Inc. will be giving a free bicycle tour of the Central and Campus District neighborhoods Tuesday, May 18 from 6 to 7:30pm.

 The tour will emphasize redevelopment activity that has occurred in both communities in recent years as well as major revitalization projects currently being planned and on the horizon in each.

 Participants will meet at the Downtown Cleveland YMCA at 2200 Prospect Avenue, and will conclude at there for healthy snacks following the tour. Secure parking will be provided free courtesy of the Downtown YMCA, but attendees must contact Jeffrey Sugalski at (216) 341-1455 or jsugalski@bbcdevelopment.org to request a parking pass.

All attendees must bring their own bicycles and are required to wear helmets to take part in the tour.

For more information about the Central & Campus District Bicycle Tour and the other events of Cleveland Bicycle Week, please visit www.clevelandbicycleweek.org  or  call (216)341-1455.