Archive for ‘ward 5’

Box Spot Business Application

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

We are now accepting applications from businesses seeking affordable and innovative commercial space within an aspiration business community. Our goal is to keep total monthly occupancy costs including rent and utilities within $500. Actual costs will be determined well before lease signing and will not exceed $600 per month. Selected businesses will receive an assortment of support including assistance with customizing units, joint marketing, and technical assistance in business growth and management.

Is your business an ideal fit for BOXSPOT? If so please complete this application.

Congratulations to Central and Kinsman’s youth football teams!

Monday, November 2nd, 2015

The Central and Kinsman neighborhoods were well represented this weekend in all three Muni-League youth football championships.  The JC Cullum Renegades, based at Lonnie Burten Recreation Center in Central played in the Varsity and Jr. Varsity Championship and the Garden Valley Falcons played in the Termite Championship games.

Even though the teams did not win we congratulate them on a successful season.

Help residents get access to fresh fruits and veggies!

Tuesday, September 15th, 2015

BBC is hiring for a Sales Manager for our Bridgeport Mobile Market, which travels throughout the east side selling fresh fruit and vegetables in places where residents may not have access to grocery stores.

If you are interested in this position please click here to find more information.

What is YOUR Milk Preference?

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

Whether it comes from a carton, a glass jar, or a plastic jug, cow’s milk is generally what most people are used to drinking. Did you know there are different kinds of milk? So, with so many different kinds of milk in grocery stores how do we know which ones to choose?

  • Soy Milk – Made from an extract of soy beans and is typically mixed with water and a natural sweetener.
  • Rice Milk – Made from a mixture of partially milled rice and water.
  • Organic Milk – Comes from cows that have been fed organic feed, roam freely, or graze on pesticide free grass.
  • Raw Milk – Comes from cows but is not pasteurized.

Cow’s milk is generally pasteurized but some people believe that you should try raw cow’s milk to ensure you are getting as many nutrients as possible. Pasteurization is the process that kills all of the harmful bacteria in raw milk by heating it to a specific temperature for a specific amount of time. Pasteurization was developed by Louis Pasteur in 1864, as a means of killing organisms responsible for diseases like typhoid fever, tuberculosis, and diphtheria.

Cow’s milk that has been pasteurized offers 9 essential nutrients such as:

  • Calcium                          
  • Protein
  • Potassium
  • Phosphorus
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin A
  • Riboflavin (B2)
  •  Niacin

What if you’re a vegan or your poor tummy can’t digest cow’s milk? There are a a lot of different choices. We suggest trying rice milk or soy milk.

Soy milk is dairy-free and made from an extract of soy beans. It is typically mixed with water and a natural sweetener so it tastes and looks similar cow’s milk. Soy milk often has calcium and vitamin D added to it to increase its nutritional value.

Rice milk is also dairy-freeand is made from a mixture of partially milled rice and water. It often has vitamin A, vitamin D, B vitamins, calcium and iron added to enhance its nutritional benefits.

No matter what you choose,it is important to keep a balanced diet. To get the full benefits of cow’s milk and these nine essential nutrients, the USDA recommends adults and children to consume two to three servings of milk (or cheese or yogurt) each day. A serving size is 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1.5 ounces of natural cheese or 2 ounces of processed cheese.

Dont forget to visit!

 BBC’s Facebook

BBC’s Twitter

CornUcopia Place’s Facebook

Bridgeport Cafe’s Facebook

Bridgeport Cafe’s Twitter

High-Fructose Corn Syrup VS Sugar – Pros and Cons

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

 What do you really know about high-fructose corn syrup and sugar? The media often portrays sugar and high-fructose corn syrup as the main culprit in obesity. But what’s the difference between high-fructose corn syrup and sugar?

High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a common sweetener. Research shows that high-fructose corn syrup is chemically similar to table sugar. Fructose, part of HFCS, is a naturally occurring simple sugar that’s produced by nature. It is more soluble in water than glucose. Glucose is another simple sugar that is also made in nature. When you put fructose and glucose together it becomes a basic form of table sugar.

Corn syrup is made from corn starch and has a high content of glucose. It is combined with fructose to make high fructose corn syrup. There is controversy over how the body reacts to high-fructose corn syrup instead of table sugar because it is made chemically.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), there are two types of sugars in American diets: naturally occurring sugars and added sugars. Women should consume no more than 100 calories per day (about 6 teaspoons of sugar). Men should consume about 150 calories per day (about 9 teaspoons).

 

Tips from the American Heart Association for Reducing Sugar in Your Diet

* Don’t add sugar to cereal, grits, or oatmeal. Try fresh fruit or dried fruit instead.

* Instead of adding sugar in recipes use various spices or extracts to increase flavor.

* Try non-nutritive sweeteners such as aspartame, sucralose or saccharin. The FDA has determined that non-nutritive sweeteners are safe.

* Cut back on the amount of sugar added to things you eat or drink regularly like coffee or tea.

* Buy sugar-free or low-calorie beverages.

* Buy fresh fruit!

The next time you are in Bridgeport Cafe, think twice about adding lots of sugar to your breakfast and consider adding fresh fruit instead!

Bridgeport Cafe featured in the Plain Dealer

Friday, September 21st, 2012

This morning the Bridgeport Cafe is featured in the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

The story explains many aspects of the Cafe in detail and features interviews with Executive Director, Tim Tramble as well as an employee of the Cafe. Follow the link below to see the full article, and be sure to stop by the Cafe in Bridgeport Place for breakfast, lunch, or a quick snack!

 

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2012/09/new_food_center_on_kinsman_roa.html

CMSD Public Meeting Announcement

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

There will be a Cleveland Metropolitan School District meeting tonight, 1/6/10, regarding the new transformation school plan.  The meeting will be located at East Technical High School, from 6pm to 8pm.  Click here for the public announcement presentation that was released today.

Charlie Comella Community Garden (Cedar Ave) Ceremony

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

You’re Invited!

What: Friskers project orange thumb ribbon cutting ceremony

En joy free garden snacks and special guest!

Trinity’s cathedral/Charlie Comella Community Garden received one of 15 Friskers Project Orange Thumb Grants awarded in the U.S for 2009.

When: Sat., Aug.15 2009-2:30pm
This event will be the capstone of the O.S.U Extension/city of Cleveland Urban Harvest

Garden Tour (9am-2pm) featuring over a dozen other gardens and urban Farms.

Where: Trinity Cathedral/Charlie Comella Community Garden,
Corner of E.35 St. and Cedar Ave., Cleveland

Who: You! Experience our garden! The food we grow helps feed the hungry and we add beauty to our inner city neighborhood.

RSVP & MORE INFO:

Scott Blanchard-phone: 216.749.4115 * email: scottwblanchard@roadrunner.com

Website/blog: http://Grantgarden.projectorangethumb.com/?cat=16